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Thread: Check this out read from the bottom up ...Audatex at it's finest


  1. Eyes wide open..... this industry will be so profitable in the next 30 years I am preparing my business for resale I know they will line the streets.. and I will retire a fat cat for sure.... or I could always start selling accessories right isn't that what ASA promoted when this whole mess started

  2. Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southaven, Mississippi
    Posts
    808

    I just love a master of sarcasm.

  3. Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    823

    Cobb's so right about ASA's promoting adding a WIDE variety of services and products in order to "make up" for the lack of proper reimbursement to shops. No one vocalized against this as much as I did at the time. Most of ASA's collision leadership were adding as many services (mechanical services, tires, glass, detailing, etc.) as possible in order to make up for what insurers were demanding in the promise of increased "volume" of work within their DRP relationships. They each wrote numerous articles about adding as many services as possible in order to make themselves more profitable. At the time I communicated with many of them and it didn't go well. And for the record, many still hold leadership positions in the various groups and associations. Their responses were always the same...."these are our personal business decisions." But when I pointed out that their "decisions" would in fact effect all shop owners/operators because they were under valuing collision repairers and their skills/services, they could have cared less.

    But, sarcasm aside. Some of us love what we do and are able to earn a decent living. So don't rip on those of us who made the choice to remain in the industry.
    "Better to die a hero, than live a coward."
    Charles Woods, father of slain SEAL Ty Woods

  4. I would never question anyone's decision no matter how bad it might be wrong for me.. but eyes wide open is important and one mans misery could be another mans delight.. we all deserve to survive and prosper no matter our decisions.. in or out..

  5. Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Southaven, Mississippi
    Posts
    808

    I could not agree more. If the "ripping" comment was directed at me, Pam, I think you may have misunderstood me. Is it not sarcastic to reference how profitable the business will be for the next 30 years and how it will be so easy to sell a collision repair shop that people will line the streets, retiring a "fat cat" from the sale? The reality for me is that, with the pool of capable technicians drying up, I have more trouble getting work out than I do getting it in. Increased costs to be EPA and OSHA compliant, investment in new tools and training, with little hope of increasing rates to offset the investments, and judges that appear to be protecting insurance companies from their responsibilities, paint the bleakest picture I have seen in all my years in the business. There are, no doubt, very bad things in our future, so I have decided now is a very good time for me to retire, whether I am able to sell or not. If it comes down to it, I will simply walk away.

  6. Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    823

    Hey, best of luck you ya! And no, I wasn't referring to anyone in particular. But I sure as hell am glad I don't count on this site to boost my confidence in my business. As far as "capable" techs "drying up", too late. That happened a while back. I follow Mike Rowe on FB and he's been trying to attract attention to the lack of training for qualified techs in many fields...love your plumber? Ya'd better show it! Love your HVAC techs, again, let them know. I brag them up every chance I get because I know how valuable they are. We have a long time friend who's a semi-retired electrician and he has yelled all this from the rooftops for the past decade. Same within our own industry. Most are either retiring, or simply leaving their fields. Sad too. Good thing my hubby is handy and can pretty much do anything.
    "Better to die a hero, than live a coward."
    Charles Woods, father of slain SEAL Ty Woods

  7. Sadly we see techs entering the electrical, plumbing and HVAC by the droves.. the young guns see they can get paid handsomely around here for these trades.. and building etc.. but not the mud and paint profession.. it is a sad state for sure...

  8. Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Ma.
    Posts
    485

    When you have a state like Ma. put in writing that insurance companies find a way to pay bodyshops less money, what do you expect?

    Not to mention that the board that oversees autobody appraisers actions is run by the Div. of Insurance.

    I would also like to add that the licence fee for appraisers is supposed to be paid to the licensing board but is taken by the Div. of insurance and disburses it pennies at a time to the board.
    Last edited by Roger Walling; 10-13-2015 at 09:20 AM. Reason: new parragraph

  9. Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    1,350

    If nothing else, this long thread about a very complicated subject, when distilled down shows the causes for failures to rectify the long standing control (abuse, disenfranchisement, whatever you want to call it) insurers have, increasingly, exercised over repairs performed by a myriad of industries. None are more pervasive or more affecting of a wide swath of businesses and individuals than the repair of automobiles. It has long been popular to blame the collision industry itself for allowing this to happen. And that is part of the problem exacerbated, by the use by the industry, of the very controls the insurer employs with the most critical the use of the pricing model that determines how the collision industry prices their production. This is and will be fatal flaw to any effort to challenge the guts of insurance control. This has been said many times, many ways and although obvious it appears to have no influence upon repairers, and equally important, those seeking through legal means to help resolve the issue.

    As long as I have watched the evolution of control, no matter the effort by legal means, no matter the resources poured into those efforts, all seem to insist on overly complicating the real issue at hand with a myriad of complaints that have no real potential for effective resolution, while avoiding that real, and singular issue. Certainly those issues like steering, market manipulation and reallocation are important, but resolution of those issues require unassailable proof of damages, impossible to factually express, if for no other reason, by using the pricing model of the insurance industry. What is left is the continuation of the very cause of destruction of independence by all repairers. The data.
    Roy Smalley,
    Texas

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